Rule Book (Hero's Handbook)

Quickstart

Welcome to Rathe, young hero.

The knowledge contained within this ancient handbook shall serve you well
on your journey through the perilous land of Rathe.

Contents

  • Makings of a Hero
  • Game Setup
  • Card & Activated Ability Types
  • Action Card Anatomy
  • Resource Points
  • Action Points
  • Priority & Active Player
  • The Chain
  • Combat Chain
  • Turn Structure

Hero Card Image

Makings of a Hero

(1) Hand Size

Start the game with this many cards in your hand. At the end of your turn, draw cards until the number of cards in your hand is equal to your hand size.

On the first turn of the game only, both players draw cards until the number of cards in their hand is equal to their hand size.

You may have cards in hand greater than your hero's hand size.

(2) Class & Card Type

Your class determines how many cards you can include in your deck.

(3) Life

Reduce your opponent's life to zero to win the game. You may gain life above the printed life value of your hero card.


THE GOLDEN RULE:

When a card's text contradicts the rules of the game, the card's text takes precedent.
Card rulings and interactions can be found below.


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Game Setup

Zones provide structure to the placement and movement on cards during the course of gameplay. Some cards refer to "the arena", which is a non-specified zone within the overall play space. It's used for cards that stay-in-play after they resolve, such as items and auras.

Start the game with your hero, weapon(s), and equipment in their respective zones. Randomize your deck and place it in the deck zone. Both players begin the game with cards in their hand equal to their hero card's hand size.

Zones:

  1. Hero - Start the game with your hero card in the hero zone.
  2. Weapon - Start the game with your weapon(s) in the weapon zone(s). When a weapon is used to attack, it moves to the chain, returning to the weapon zone when the combat chain closes.
  3. Equipment (Head, Chest, Arms, Legs) - Start the game with your corresponding equipment in these zones. When an equipment card is used to defend, it moves to the chain until the combat chain closes.
  4. Chain Zone
  5. Pitch Zone
  6. Arsenal - see below.
  7. Deck - Your deck is placed face-down in the deck zone.
  8. Graveyard - When a card is destroyed, discarded, defends or resolves, it's put into the graveyard. See "Combat Chain" for details of when cards are put into the graveyard from a combat chain. Cards in the graveyard are public information (players may look at cards in both graveyards).
  9. Banished - This is where cards go when they are "banished". Specific cards effects tell you when a card is banished. Cards in the banished zone are public information.

Arsenal

The arsenal is where you can store a key card for use on a future turn. At the end of your turn, if you have a card in your hand and your arsenal is empty, you may put a card from your hand face-down into your arsenal.

You cannot pitch or defend from the arsenal. You can only play cards from arsenal. (Tip - Defense reaction cards can be played from arsenal.)

Card & Activated Ability Types

There are 7 different card types that exist in Flesh and Blood. The following 4 card types make up your deck:

  • Action (requires an action point to play)
  • Attack Reaction
  • Defense Reaction
  • Instant

The following 3 card types begin the game in the arena:

  • Hero
  • Weapon
  • Equipment

Activated Ability Types

There are 4 different activated ability types that exist in Flesh and Blood:

  • Action (requires an action point to play)
  • Attack Reaction
  • Defense Reaction
  • Instant

Card Subtypes

Card subtypes are used to attach additional information to a card. Subtypes have 2 functions:

  1. To attach a trait to a card. (For example, all weapon cards have a subtype that defines what kind of weapon it is, such as club, dagger, hammer, or sword.) A subtype trait does not inherently mean anything by itself, but is relevant for interaction with other cards that care about that trait. For example, if the weapon you use has the subtype sword, then cards that buff or modify swords may be of interest to your deck.
  2. To attach rules to a card. The following subtypes attach rules to a card:
  • Attack - When an action card with subtype attack (referred to as an "attack action card") is played to an empty chain, a combat chain opens.
  • Aura - When an aura card resolves, it becomes a permanent in the arena. Auras typically have triggered abilities that cause them to be destroyed.
  • Item - When an item card resolves, it becomes a permanent in the arena. Some items have a one-time use, such as potions which require you to destroy (drink) them to use their effects; items can have an activated, triggered, or static ability that can have a long-term impact on the game.
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Action Card Anatomy

Action cards make up the majority of cards in most decks. It costs an action point to play an action card. An action card with subtype attack will open a combat chain when you play it. An action card with subtype aura or item will stay in the arena when it resolves. An action card with no subtype will go to the graveyard when it resolves.

  1. Pitch value - how many resource points can be gained by pitching this card.
  2. Colour strip - use this to easily calculate pitch value (Red=1, Yellow =2, Blue = 3).
  3. Cost - how many resource points it costs to play
  4. Power - 0 the damage this card can deal to an opposing hero.
  5. Class - your hero must be this class to have this card in your deck. Generic cards can be included in any deck.
  6. Card type - information about the different card types that can be found above.
  7. Defense - the damage this card can prevent if used to defend.

Examples of other card types can be found in the appendix.

Resource Points

You can pitch 1 or more cards from your hand to gain resource points equal to the card's pitch value. To pitch a card, put it face-up in the pitch zone. You may only pitch a card when there is a resource cost to pay, and you don't already have resource points in your resource pool that could pay for that cost.

If you gain more resource points than is required to pay a cost, the unused resource points remain in your resource pool until the end of turn phase.

At the end of every turn, both players put all cards in their pitch zone on the bottom of their deck in any order.

Action Points

At the beginning of your action phase each turn, you get 1 action point.

Action cards and action activated abilities cost an action point to play.

There are many ways to gain additional action points, allowing you to play more than 1 action point in a single turn. The most common way to action cards or activated abilities with the keyword go again.

Go again means "When this action resolves, gain 1 action point." Multiple instances of go again on the same card or activated ability do not stack. If a card or activated ability has gained multiple instances of go again, when that action card resolves, the player will gain 1 action point only.

Priority & Active Player

Priority is the game system structure that dictates when a player may play cards and/or activated abilities. A player can only play a card or activated ability if they have priority.

The action phase is the only phase when players get priority. At the beginning of the action phase, the game system gives the turn player priority.

When a player has priority, they are considered "the active player". When the active player has nothing they can/want to play at that time, they pass priority to the opposing player.

If there is a card, ability, or effect waiting to resolve on the chain, it will resolve when both players pass priority in succession. If there are no cards, abilities, or effects waiting to resolve, and both players pass priority in succession (passing on an empty chain), the action phase will end.

The Chain

The chain is the framework for how cards, activated abilities, and triggered effects are processed, can be responded to, and resolve.

Playing Cards & Activated Abilities

  1. If an action card, instant card, or activated ability is played, or an effect has triggered, and the chain is empty, that card, activated ability, or triggered effect becomes layer 1 on the chain. If the card has the subtype attack or the activated ability has the effect attack, a combat chain opens. The active player retains priority.
  2. Instant cards and instant activated abilities can be played, and/or triggered effects can be added as additional layers on the chain.

Resolving Layers

  1. When both players pass priority in succession, the top layer on the chain resolves, then the turn player gains priority. (For example, the chain has 3 layers and both players pass priority. The card, ability, or effect at layer 3 will resolve, then the turn player gains priority. When a player has priority, they may play or activate an instant to add a new layer to the chain, or they pass priority. When both players have passed in succession, the highest remaining layer on the chain resolves. This process repeats until layer 1 resolves and the chain closes.)
  2. When a card resolves, it's put into the graveyard.
  3. When layer 1 on the chain resolves, the chain closes and the turn player gains priority.

Combat Chain

The combat chain is the framework for how players attack and defend. It's mostly through interactions on the combat chain that the winner of the game is determined.

When you play an attack to an empty chain, a combat chain opens and the attack becomes chain link 1. When a chain link resolves, you may continue the combat chain by playing another attack. Each additional attack creates a new chain link; chain link 2, chain link 3, and so on.

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A chain link is structured as follows:

  1. Attack Step - The turn player plays an action card with subtype attack, or an activated ability with the effect attack (a weapon card).
  2. Defend Step - The defending hero can defend with any number of non-defense reaction cards from their hand and/or equipment cards they control. There is no cost to defend with a card, simply put it on the chain next to the attack to add it's defense value to the chain link. The defending hero must declare all cards and/or equipment they are defending with at one time. They become "defending cards". Defending cards stay in the chain zone until the combat chain closes. After defending cards (if any) have been declared, move to the reaction step.
  3. Reaction Step - During the reaction step, only attack reactions, defense reactions and instants can be played. Defense reaction cards can be played from hand and/or arsenal. When a defense reaction card resolves, it becomes a "defending card."
  4. Damage Calculation - If the total power of the attack is greater than the total defense value of defending cards, the defending hero will be dealt damage equal to the difference. If the defending hero is dealt damage this way, the attack is considered to have hit.
  5. Chain Link Resolution - Resolve triggered effects. If the attack has go again, the attacking hero gains 1 action point.

When a chain link resolves, the turn player may continue the combat chain by playing another attack. If they do, it becomes the attack step of chain link N, where N is 1+ the number of previous chain links on the combat chain. If they don't, the combat chain closes, all permanents (such as weapons and equipment) return to their respective zones, and all other cards are put into their owners graveyard.

Turn Structure

Start of Turn Phase

The start of turn phase exists only for the administration of "at the start of turn" triggered effects and the expiration of "until the start of turn" effects. Players do not get priority during this phase. Unless there is an "at the start of turn" triggered effect, the game will proceed directly to the action phase.

  1. "Until the start of turn" effects end.
  2. "At the start of turn" triggers (if any) are added to the chain in the order chosen by the turn player. Because players do not get priority during the start of turn phase, after all triggered effects (if any) have been added to the chain, the chain will resolve as if both players were passing priority in succession.
  3. When the chain is empty, the start of turn phase ends.

Action Phase

The action phase is when cards and activated abilities are played.

  1. At the beginning of the action phase, the turn player gets 1 action point. This is a game system effect and does not use the chain.
  2. "At the beginning of the action phase" triggers (if any) are added to the chain, in the order chosen by the turn player, then the turn player gains priority.
  3. When a player has priority, they may play card and/or activated abilities.
  4. When both players pass priority in succession on an empty chain, the action phase ends. Typically, this is when the turn player has no action points remaining.

End of Turn Phase

Players do not get priority during the end of turn phase (also referred to as End Phase). During the end of turn phase, the following happen in this order:

  1. "At the beginning of the end phase" triggers (if any) are added to the chain in the order chosen by the turn player. Because players do not get priority during the end of turn phase, after all triggered effects (if any) have been added to the chain, the chain will resolve as if both players were passing priority in succession.
  2. All unused action points and resource points are lost.
  3. If the turn player has an empty arsenal zone, they may put a card from their hand face-down into their arsenal.
  4. Each player puts all cards (if any) from their pitch zone on the bottom of their deck in any order.
  5. The turn player draw cards until the number of cards in their hand is equal to their hand size.
    1. On the first turn of the game only, both players draw cards until the number of cards in their hand is equal to their hand size.
  6. "Until end of turn" and "This turn" effects end.
  7. The turn ends.

Advanced Rules

Contents

  • Game Setup
  • Playing Cards & Activated Abilities
    • Triggered Effects
  • The Chain
    • Playing Cards & Activated Abilities
    • Resolving Layers
  • Combat Chain
    • Chain Link & Layers
    • Attack Step
    • Defend Step
    • Reaction Step
    • Damage Calculation
    • Chain Link Resolution

Game Setup (Advanced)

For official constructed play, a player registers up to 80 cards and 1 hero card. A deck may contain up to 3 copies of each unique card.

At the start of a match, each player places their hero card face-up in their hero zone, then each player chooses the weapon(s), equipment, and 60 card (minimum) deck they will use for this game from their registered cards. When both players confirm they have chosen the cards they will use for this game, they put their weapon and equipment cards face-up into their respective zones, randomize their deck, and begin the game.

A tournament match is best of 1, with a 50-minute time limit.

For detailed information about Flesh and Blood tournament rules, visit our rules and policies page.

Playing Cards & Activated Abilities (Advanced)

The active player (the player who has priority) may play cards and/or activated abilities, or pass priority. To play a card or activated ability:

Announce

  1. Announce the card or activated ability being played and place it face-up in the chain zone. If the card or activated ability has a variable cost (the cost includes X), declare what the value of X is, then;
  2. If the card or activated ability has additional costs that are optional, declare if any optional cost(s) will be paid, then;
  3. Choose targets (if any), then;

Determine Resource Cost

  1. Declare if an alternate cost is being paid (if this is an option), then;
  2. Apply effects that increase resource point costs, then;
  3. Apply effects that reduce resource point costs, then;

Pay Costs

  1. If you have resource points in your resource pool equal to or greater than the resource cost to pay, you must use those resource points to pay the resource cost. If not, then;
  2. You may pitch a card from your hand to gain resource points.
  3. Pay additional costs (if any), then;
  4. If the card or activated ability is an action, pay 1 action point, then;

Becomes a Layer

  1. The card or activated ability is now considered to have been "played". It becomes a layer on the chain. If the card has the subtype attack, a combat chain opens.

Triggered Effects

Triggered effects are added to the chain. If multiple effects trigger simultaneously, the turn player chooses the order in which the triggered effects are added to the chain (including triggered effects controlled by the opponent). Each triggered effect is a seperate layer on the chain.

The Chain (Advanced)

The chain is the framework for how cards, activated abilities, and triggered effects are processed, can be responded to, and resolve.

Playing Cards & Activated Abilities

1. If an action card, instant card, or activated ability is played, or an effect has triggered, and the chain is empty, that card, activated ability, or triggered effect becomes layer 1 on the chain. If the card has the subtype attack or the activated ability has the effect attack, a combat chain opens. The active player retains priority.

2. The active player may play instant cards and/or instant activated abilities as additional layers on the chain, or they pass priority. Triggered effects (if any) are added as layers on the chain.

Resolving Layers

3. When both players pass priority in succession, the top layer on the chain resolves, then the turn player gains priority. (For example, the chain has 3 layers and both players pass priority. The card, ability, or effect at layer 3 will resolve, then the turn player gains priority. When a player has priority, they may play or activate an instant to add a new layer to the chain, or they pass priority. When both players have passed in succession, the highest remaining layer on the chain resolves. This process repeats until layer 1 resolves and the chain closes.)

4. When a card resolves, it's put into the graveyard.

5. When layer 1 on the chain resolves, the chain closes and the turn player gains priority.

Combat Chain (Advanced)

The combat chain is the framework for how players attack and defend. In general, it's the interactions that happen on the combat chain which ultimately determine the winner of a game of Flesh and Blood.

When a card with subtype attack or an activated ability with the effect attack is played to an empty chain, a combat chain opens.

Chain Links & Layers

A combat chain is made up of 1 or more chain links. A chain link is a special game state, where an attack moves through multiple steps of resolution.

The steps of a chain link are:

  1. Attack Step
  2. Defend Step
  3. Reaction Step
  4. Damage Calculation
  5. Chain Link Resolution

Attack Step

  1. When an action card with subtype attack or an activated ability with the effect attack is played and the chain is empty, a combat chain opens and that attack action card or activated ability becomes layer 1 of chain link 1 of the combat chain. If a combat chain is already open, that attack action card or activated ability becomes layer 1 of chain link N, where N is 1 + the number of previous chain links on the combat chain. The turn player retains priority.
  2. The active player may play instant cards and/or instant activated abilities on the chain link, or they pass priority. Triggered effects (if any) are added as layers on the chain link.
  3. When both players pass priority in succession, the top layer on the chain link resolves, then the turn player gains priority. Instant cards, activated abilities, and/or triggered effects resolve as detailed in "Resolving Layers". (Instant cards are put into the graveyard when they resolve.)
    When both players pass priority on layer 1 of the chain link, the player who controls the attack action card or activated ability becomes the "attacking hero" and the opponent becomes the "defending hero". Effects of the attack action card or activated ability that are not dependent on damage calculation or chain link resolution will resolve.
    Example 1: If you played an attack action card with the text "Draw a card", you would draw a card now. If the text said "If this hits, draw a card", you would draw a card during resolution of the chain link, after damage calculation has determined if the attack hit.
    Example 2: Go again is an effect that means "When this action resolves, gain 1 action point." You gain the action point when the action resolves, which is during chain link resolution.
  4. The attack action card or activated ability remains as layer 1 of the chain link until the combat chain closes. The card stays in the chain zone until the combat chain closes.
  5. The attack step ends. The chain link moves to the defend step.

Defend Step

  1. Players do not get priority during the defend step.
  2. The defending hero can defend with any number of non-defense reaction cards from their hand and/or equipment cards they control.
    1. A card must have a defense value to be able to defend (zero is a value).
    2. There is no cost to defend with a card.
    3. The defending hero must declare cards and/or equipment they are defending with at one time. They become "defending cards."
    4. All defending cards and/or equipment are added to the chain link simultaneously.
    5. Defending with a card is not playing a card.
    6. Defending with a card(s) does not create a layer on the chain link.
    7. Defending cards are placed on the chain link they are defending and remain in the chain zone until the combat chain closes.
  3. When the defending hero has declared defending cards (if any), unless an effect has triggered, the defend step ends and the chain link moves to the reaction step. If an effect has triggered, it's added as a layer to the chain link. If multiple effects trigger simultaneously, the turn player chooses the order the triggered effects are added to the chain link. Because players do not get priority during the defend step, after all triggered effects have been added to the chain link, each layer will resolve as if both players were passing priority in succession until only layer 1 of the chain link remains (the attack), then the defend step ends.

Reaction Step

During the reaction step, the attacking hero can play attack reaction cards and activated abilities, the defending hero can play defense reaction cards and activated abilities, and both players can play instant cards and activated abilities.

  1. The attacking hero gains priority.
  2. When the attacking hero has priority, they can play attack reaction and/or instant cards and/or activated abilities as additional layers on the chain link, or they pass priority. If they play a card or activated ability, they retain priority.
  3. Triggered effects (if any) are added as layers to the chain link. If multiple effects trigger simultaneously, the turn player chooses the order in which the triggered effects are added to the chain link.
  4. When the defending hero has priority, they can play defense reaction and/or instant cards and/or activated abilities as additional layers on the chain link, or they pass priority. If they play a card or an activated ability, they retain priority.
    1. Defense reaction cards are played to the chain link, paying costs as normal. (Note: Defense reaction cards can be played from arsenal.)
    2. When a defense reaction card resolves, it becomes a "defending card". (Note - A defense reaction played from hand will turn on the Reprise effect of Warrior cards. A defense reaction is considered a defending card and the game system will look at which zone the defending card came from when determining whether Reprise is activated or not.)
  5. Triggered effects (if any) are added as layers to the chain link. If multiple effects trigger simultaneously, the turn player chooses the order in which the triggered effects are added to the chain link.
  6. When both players pass priority in succession, the top layer on the chain link resolves, then the turn player gains priority.
    1. Instant cards, activated abilities, and/or triggered effects resolve as detailed in "Resolving Layers". (Instant cards are put into the graveyard when they resolve.)
    2. Attack reaction cards and defense reaction cards stay in the chain zone until the combat chain closes.
  7. When both players pass priority in succession on layer 1 of the chain link, the reaction step ends and the chain link moves to damage calculation.

Damage Calculation

Players do not get priority during damage calculation.

Damage calculation is when the total power of the attack is compared to the total defense value of the defending cards.

If the total power of the attack is greater than the total defense value of the defending cards, the defending hero will be dealt damage equal to the difference. If the defending hero is dealt damage this way, the attack is considered to have "hit".

Chain Link Resolution

  1. Triggered effects (if any) are added as layers to the chain link. If multiple effects trigger simultaneously, the turn player chooses the order in which the triggered effects are added to the chain link, then the turn player gains priority.
  2. The active player may play instant cards and/or instant activated abilities as additional layers on the chain link, or they pass priority. Triggered effects (if any) are added as layers on the chain link.
  3. When both players pass priority in succession, the top layer on the chain link resolves, then the turn player gains priority.
  4. When both players pass priority in succession on layer 1 of the chain link, the chain link resolves.
  5. If the attack action has go again, the controller of the attack gains 1 action point.

When a chain link resolves, the turn player may continue the combat chain by playing another card with a subtype attack or an activated ability with the effect attack. If they do, it becomes the attack step of chain link N, where N is 1+ the number of previous chain links on the combat chain. If they don't the combat chain closes, all permanents (such as weapons and equipment) return to their respective zones from the combat chain, and all other cards are put into their owners' graveyard, then the turn player gains priority.

Glossary

Activated Ability - An ability printed in the text box of a card that requires a cost to use. Activated abilities are always written [Ability type] - [Cost]: Effect

Active player - The player who currently has the priority.

Arena - A non-specified zone within the overall play space, used for cards that stay-in-play after they resolve.

Arsenal - A zone where you can store 1 card to play on a future turn.

Attack - Attack cards with subtype attack and weapon cards with an attack activated ability; create combat chains.

Aura - Cards with subtype aura stay in the arena when they resolve.

Chain - The zone where cards, activated abilities, and triggered effects are processed and resolved.

Chain link - A combat chain is made up of 1 or more chain links. Each attack creates a separate chain link.

Class - Each hero has a class. You may only have generic cards and cards linked to your hero's deck.

Colour Strip - Cards with a red colour strip pitch for 1 resource point, yellow pitch for 2, and blue pitch for 3. This is a quick way to assess your hand, and track your opponent's pitch zone.

Combat Chain - When you play an attack, a combat chain opens in the combat zone. A combat chain is made up of 1 or more chain links.

Cost - The amount of resource points required to pay for a card or activated ability. The cost of a card is shown in the top right corner. The cost of an activated ability is shown in the text box.

Deck - For official constructed play, a deck must have a minimum of 60 cards. If you run out of cards in your deck (exhausted), you do not lose the game. However if you hero becomes exhausted, you will likely lose the game, because you will not have cards to attack or defend with. A deck may contain up to 3 copies of each unique card

Defending card - A card that is adding defensive value to a chain link. Includes cards the defending hero defended with from their hand, equipment, and defense reaction cards.

Discard - When a card effect causes a player to discard a card from their hand. Pitching a card is not discarding.

Dominate - An attack that is difficult to defend. The defending hero can't defend an attack with dominate with more than 1 card from their hand. Equipment and defense reaction cards played from arsenal are a useful way to get around dominate.

Equipment - Head, Chest, Arms, Legs are the 4 types of equipment that exist. They start the game in their respective zones, and are not included in your deck. You may have 1 equipment card per equipment zone.

Go again - When an action with go again resolves, its controller gains 1 action point. Multiple instances of go again on the same card or activated ability do not stack. If a card or activated ability have multiple instances of go again, when it resolves, it's controller gains 1 action point only.

Hit - If the defending hero is dealt 1 or more damage during damage calculation (total power of an attack - total defense value of defending cards), the attack is considered to have "hit".

Item - Cards with subtype item stay in the arena when they resolve.

Layer - A card, ability, or effect on the chain waiting to resolve.

Pitch - Putting a card from your hand face-up into your pitch zone to gain resource points.

Pitch value - The number of resource points that would be gained from a card if you pitch it. Pitch value is shown in the top left corner of cards that make up your deck.

Priority - The player with priority can play cards and/or activated abilities, or pass priority to the opponent. A player can only play a card or activated ability if they have priority.

Reprise - A warrior mechanic that showcases the prowess a warrior has when they are engaged in close combat. Reprise effects "turn on" if the defending hero has defended with a card from their hand.

Resource pool - If you gain more resource points than required for a cost, the additional resource points will remain in your resource pool until you either use them, or the turn ends.

Triggered effect - A card effect that starts with "When" or "If".

Turn player - The player whose turn it is.

Young Hero - Young hero cards are primarily used for sealed deck and booster draft play. We recommend using young heroes when learning to play Flesh and Blood, and when you want to play a shorter game (15-20 minutes).

1H/2H weapon - A 2H weapon requires 2 weapon zones to use. A 1H weapon requires 1 weapon zone to use.

Appendix

Contents

  • "Stay in play" Card Anatomy
  • Attack Reaction Card Anatomy
  • Defense Reaction Card Anatomy
  • Instant Card Anatomy
  • Weapon Card Anatomy
  • Equipment Card Anatomy

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"Stay in play" Card Anatomy

Items and auras stay in the arena until you use them. They are powerful because they allow you to do more in a single turn than you normally could with only the cards you draw.

  1. Pitch value - How many resource points can be gained by pitching this card.
  2. Colour strip - Use this to easily calculate pitch value (Red = 1, Yellow = 2, Blue = 3)
  3. Cost - How many resource points it costs to play.
  4. Class - Your hero must be this class to have this card in your deck. Generic cards can be included in any deck.
  5. Card type
  6. Card subtype - When a card with sub-type aura or item resolves, it becomes a permanent in the arena.
  7. Activated ability - Activated abilities are always written [Activated Ability Type] - [Cost]: [Effect]

Potion of Strength is an action card with subtype item. It costs an action point to play Potion of Strength into the arena. The activated ability of Potion of Strength also costs an action point. Potion of Strength must be in the arena to use its activated ability.

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Attack Reaction Card Anatomy

Attack reactions are sneaky, allowing the attacking player to buff or modify an attack after the defending step has passed, pushing through damage or important hit effects.

  1. Pitch value - How many resource points can be used by pitching this card.
  2. Colour strip - Use this to easily calculate pitch value (Red = 1, Yellow = 2, Blue = 3)
  3. Cost - How many resource points it costs to play
  4. Class - Your hero must be this class to have this card in your deck. Generic cards can be included in any deck.
  5. Card type
  6. Defense - The damage this card can prevent if used to defend.

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Defense Reaction Card Anatomy

Defense reaction cards are powerful because they allow the defending player to be the last to act, provide effects while defending, and they can be played from arsenal.

  1. Pitch value - How many resource points can be used by pitching this card.
  2. Colour strip - Use this to easily calculate pitch value (Red = 1, Yellow = 2, Blue = 3)
  3. Cost - How many resource points it costs to play
  4. Class - Your hero must be this class to have this card in your deck. Generic cards can be included in any deck.
  5. Card type
  6. Defense - The damage this card can prevent if used to defend.

Having a defense reaction in arsenal allows you to play around attacks with dominate, as you can defend with 1 card from hand and play a defense reaction from arsenal. Against a warrior, a defense reaction card played from arsenal allows you to defend without turning on the warrior's reprise effects.

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Instant Card Anatomy

Instant cards are powerful because they offer flexibility. They don't require an action point to play, they can be played during either player's action phase, and they can be played in response to other cards and effects.

  1. Pitch value - How many resource points can be used by pitching this card.
  2. Colour strip - Use this to easily calculate pitch value (Red = 1, Yellow = 2, Blue = 3)
  3. Cost - How many resource points it costs to play
  4. Class - Your hero must be this class to have this card in your deck. Generic cards can be included in any deck.
  5. Card type

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Weapon Card Anatomy

Your weapon card(s) start the game in your weapon zones. A weapon with an attack effect can be used to open or continue a combat chain. When a weapon is attacking, it moves to the chain zone, returning to your weapon zone when the combat chain closes.

  1. Power - The damage this card can deal to an opposing hero.
  2. Class - Your hero must be this class to have this card in your deck.
  3. Card type
  4. Card subtype - Every weapon has a subtype trait that defines what kind of weapon it is. This is relevant for interacting with other cards that care about that subtype trait.
  5. 1H/2H - How many hands are required to wield this weapon. A 2H weapon requires 2 weapon zones to use. A 1H weapon requires 1 weapon zone to use.
  6. Activated ability - Activated abilities are always written [Activated Ability Type] - [Cost]: [Effect].

Weapons are powerful because they are reusable sources of damage.

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Equipment Card Anatomy

Your equipment cards start the game in their respective equipment zones. You may have 1 equipment card per equipment zone. When an equipment is defending, it moves to the chain zone, returning to its equipment zone when the combat chain closes.

  1. Class - Your hero must be this class to have this card in your deck. Generic cards can be included in any deck.
  2. Card type
  3. Card subtype - Every equipment has a subtype trait that defines the equipment zone that equipment can start the game in. The equipment zones are Head, Chest, Arms, and Legs.
  4. Defense - The damage this card can prevent if used to defend.
  5. Activated ability - Activated abilities are always written [Activated Ability Type] - [Cost]: [Effect].

Equipment are useful because they provide defensive options without having to use cards from your hand. Equipment can provide effects to support your core strategy and/or counteract the opponent's strategy.